Neuropediatrics 2018; 49(S 02): S1-S69
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676010
Posters
Therapy Strategies and Free Topics
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

P 235. Short-Term Effects of Lunch with Varying Glycemic Index on Children’s Cognitive Function—CogniDo GI-II

Kathrin Sinningen
1  Research Department of Child Nutrition, University Children’s Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany
,
Alina Drozdowska
1  Research Department of Child Nutrition, University Children’s Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany
,
Michael Falkenstein
2  Institute of Work, Learning and Ageing (ALA), Bochum, Germany
,
Thomas Lücke
1  Research Department of Child Nutrition, University Children’s Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany
,
Mathilde Kersting
1  Research Department of Child Nutrition, University Children’s Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
30 October 2018 (online)

 

Background: Interventional studies show that breakfasts varying in glycemic index (GI) can influence children’s cognitive functions. The Cognition Intervention Study Dortmund – CogniDo GI-I investigated 2016 for the first time, if the GI of lunch has short-term effects (within 45 minutes) on selected cognitive parameter as well. However, significant effects were not determined. The aim of this CogniDo GI-II study is if the GI of lunch has cognition modulating effects later in the afternoon.

Methods: A randomized, crossover study was performed on 2 test days. Two hundred fifty-one participants (fifth and sixth grades) were randomly assigned to one of two groups. On day 1, group 1 received a carbohydrate-rich rice dish with high GI (79 ± 6) and group 2 a rice dish with medium GI (64 ± 4). On day 2, 1 week later, groups switched lunch. The cognitive parameter tonic alertness, task switching, and working memory updating were tested 90 minutes after lunch. After carryover effects between both days were excluded, statistical analysis of normally distributed results was performed with t-test, nonnormally distributed with Wilcoxon’s rank-sum test. Effects of lunch size were analyzed using a linear mixed model.

Results: Extending the time between nutritional intervention and cognitive testing showed no significant differences between high and medium GI lunch.

Conclusion: The GI of lunch has no influence on cognitive performance of school children. However, this computer-based analysis of cognitional parameter could be useful for neuropediatric questions with regard to the influence of the GI on cognition among children with metabolic diseases.

Funding: Uniscientia Foundation, Vaduz.