Neuropediatrics 2018; 49(S 02): S1-S69
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1675973
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Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

P 773. Standard Values for Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the First Year of Life

Gabriel Promnitz
1  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Sozialpädiatrisches Zentrum, Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Berlin, Germany
,
Naomi Mohr
1  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Sozialpädiatrisches Zentrum, Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Berlin, Germany
,
Birgit Spors
2  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Kinderradiologie, Berlin, Germany
,
Angela M. Kaindl
1  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Sozialpädiatrisches Zentrum, Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Berlin, Germany
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Pädiatrie m.S. Neurologie, Berlin, Germany
4  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institut für Zell- und Neurobiologie, Berlin, Germany
,
Joanna Schneider
1  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Sozialpädiatrisches Zentrum, Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Berlin, Germany
3  Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Pädiatrie m.S. Neurologie, Berlin, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
30 October 2018 (online)

 

Introduction: Regions of the infant brain are investigated using cranial magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). However, there is a lack of quantitative standard values resulting in a data interpretation that is often subjective or based on data derived from small patient cohorts. The aim of this study was to create simple linear measurements to assess brain structures in children without cerebral malformation during the first year of life.

Methods: cMRI sessions of 131 children without intracerebral pathology were assessed retrospectively for size of various brain structures throughout the first year of life.

Results: Standard values for size and growth rate of 14 brain structures including lateral ventricles, subarachnoid space, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebellar vermis, pituitary gland, optical nerve, corpus callosum, and the tegmentovermian angle were defined.

Conclusion: The reported data serve as reference for the quantitative assessment of the infant brain. The size change of various brain regions gives insight into the development of brain structures during the first year of life.