CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · IJNS 2018; 07(02): 116-121
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1668493
Original Article
Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd.

Factors Affecting the Outcome of Multiple Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery

Anas Abdallah
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
*  Drs. Abdallah and Asiltürk contributed equally to this work.
,
Murad Asiltürk
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University of Health Science, Bakırköy Research and Training Hospital for Neurology Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey
*  Drs. Abdallah and Asiltürk contributed equally to this work.
,
Erhan Emel
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University of Health Science, Bakırköy Research and Training Hospital for Neurology Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey
,
Betül Güler Abdallah
3  Department of Neurology-Intensive Care Unit, University of Health Science, Bakırköy Research and Training Hospital for Neurology Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 03 April 2018

accepted after revision: 21 July 2018

Publication Date:
24 August 2018 (online)

  

Abstract

Objectives Multiple intracranial aneurysms (MIAs) are fairly common entities. Unless MIAs are incidentally diagnosed, they remain asymptomatic until they rupture. In this study, the authors investigated factors affecting the surgical outcomes in patients with MIA by evaluating the surgical outcomes of 90 consecutive cases.

Material and Methods Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 409 consecutive cerebral aneurysm cases that underwent surgery in the hospital from 2011 to 2013. The patients’ data were prospectively collected. All MIA patients (n = 90) constituted the core sample for this study.

Results The authors detected 221 aneurysms in 90 patients (49 females and 41 males; mean age: 50.8 ± 11.9 years; range: 25–82 years). Of the patients, 67 presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas 23 were incidentally diagnosed with unruptured aneurysms. The mortality rate was 13.3% (n = 12). The morbidity rate was 18.8% (n = 17). Of the patients, 67.8% (n = 61) had returned to their jobs and normal daily activities by their last follow-up (average: 52.3 months). History of coronary artery diseases (CADs) and low neurologic grade at presentation (Hunt-Hess grade 4/5) are independent risk factors for increasing morbidity and mortality in patients with MIA (odds ratio [OR]: 18.46; p = 0.007); (OR: 30.0; p = 0.002) and (OR: 0.06; p = 0.0001); (OR: 0.07; p = 0.002), respectively.

Conclusion History of CADs and high Hunt-Hess grade are independent risk factors for poor surgical outcomes of patients with MIA.