Jnl Wrist Surg 2019; 08(02): 143-146
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1667307
Case Report
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Arthroscopic Treatment of Translunate Perilunate Injuries, Not Dislocated (PLIND)

Guillaume Herzberg
1  Wrist Surgery Unit, Department of Orthopaedics, Claude-Bernard Lyon 1 University, Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France
,
Maxime Cievet-Bonfils
1  Wrist Surgery Unit, Department of Orthopaedics, Claude-Bernard Lyon 1 University, Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France
,
Marion Burnier
1  Wrist Surgery Unit, Department of Orthopaedics, Claude-Bernard Lyon 1 University, Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

27 March 2018

26 June 2018

Publication Date:
07 August 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Translunate perilunate dislocations were recently described as well as perilunate injuries, not dislocated (PLIND). The authors present a case of transradial styloid, translunate PLIND which sustained a full arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation.

Case Description A 33-year-old man sustained a transradial styloid, translunate PLIND due to a fall from a truck with his wrist in hyperextension. The diagnosis was made at the acute stage. Full arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation with Kirschner wires was performed, followed by a 6 weeks' immobilization period. Uneventful healing of both the lunate and radial styloid were observed at 6 weeks and confirmed with a computed tomography scan. At 4 years of follow-up, the Lyon wrist score was 78% (good).

Literature Review Very few lunate fractures are described in the literature. Translunate perilunate dislocations were recently described as well as PLIND. To the best of the authors' knowledge, a case of transradial styloid, translunate PLIND which sustained a full arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation has never been reported so far.

Clinical Relevance This case reports a unique pattern of transradial styloid, translunate PLIND and outlines the usefulness of a full arthroscopic treatment. An open reduction for this pattern of injury would have been extensive, difficult, and probably unreliable.