J Pediatr Neurol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1667196
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Excessive Salivation as a Hidden Comorbidity of Basal Ganglia Germ Cell Tumor

Kenichiro Kobayashi
1  Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
2  Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
,
Minoru Suehiro
1  Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
2  Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
,
Toshiro Maihara
2  Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
,
Ikuya Usami
1  Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
2  Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
,
Toshio Heike
2  Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki General Medical Center, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

23 April 2018

13 June 2018

Publication Date:
30 July 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

The progression of basal ganglia germ cell tumor (BGGCT) is slow and insidious, and the diagnosis is often delayed. We report here an 11-year-old boy with BGGCT associated with psychomotor deterioration and excessive salivation. Serial salivary gland scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography suggested that the dysregulation of basal ganglia to cortical circuitry accounts for the neurological comorbidity associated with BGGCT. We also found that topical scopolamine patches are safe and effective to suppress excessive salivation.

Clinical Trial Registration: No.

Financial Disclosure

All authors have no financial relationships relevant to this article to disclose.


Ethical Approval

Written informed consent for the usage of topical scopolamine patches and publication of the clinical course was obtained from the guardians.


Authors' Contributions

Dr. Kobayashi conceptualized and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, and reviewed and revised the manuscript. Dr. Suehiro and Dr. Usami reviewed and analyzed the data. Dr. Maihara and Dr. Heike critically reviewed the manuscript. All authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work.