Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2018; 31(05): 327-331
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1666875
Original Research
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Comparison of Simultaneously Collected Kinetic Data with Force Plates and a Pressure Walkway

Gabriella Sandberg
1  Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States
,
Bryan Torres
2  Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, United States
,
Amanda Berjeski
1  Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States
,
Steven Budsberg
1  Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

11 September 2017

09 May 2018

Publication Date:
23 August 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective This article compares simultaneously collected kinetic data (percent limb distribution and limb symmetry) with force plates (FP) and a pressure walkway.

Animals This study included 18 healthy client-owned adult dogs.

Methods Vertical ground reaction force and pressure data were collected during two sessions 1 week apart (days 1 and 7) using both FP and pressure mat systems. Vertical ground reaction forces and vertical pressure data were each collected alone as well as simultaneously. A mixed effects model was used to test for differences in force, force percent data and symmetry indices (SI) that were calculated for the thoracic and pelvic limb pairs, between collection systems. A Pearson's correlation was used to test for correlations between force, force percentage and SI.

Results There was no difference in peak vertical force (PVF) or total pressure index (TPI) data collected alone or when collected with pressure mat overlay the FP. Small but significant differences were found in percent limb distribution between PVF% and TPI%. Significant differences were found in the calculated SI for forelimbs and hindlimbs. Correlations between the PVF% and TPI% distribution were significant in both the fore- and hindlimbs. While there was a significant correlation between the forelimb SI, there was no significant correlation between the SI in the hindlimbs.

Clinical Significance The method of calculating PVF and TPI percentages allowed for comparison between the collection methods. Significant differences were noted in the calculated SI between the collection methods and direct comparisons is not advisable.

Author Contributions

Gabriella Sandberg and Steven Budsberg contributed to conception of study, study design, acquisition of data and data analysis and interpretation. Bryan Torres contributed to conception of study, study design and data analysis and interpretation. Amanda Berjeski contributed to study design, acquisition of data and data analysis and interpretation. All authors drafted, revised and approved the submitted manuscript.