CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · AJP Rep 2018; 08(02): e128-e133
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1660519
Case Report
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

A Qualitative Analysis of Challenges and Successes in Retinopathy of Prematurity Screening

Lisa C. Bain
Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
,
Alexandria I. Kristensen-Cabrera
Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
,
Henry C. Lee
Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was supported by grant K23HD068400, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development or National Institutes of Health.
Further Information

Publication History

30 October 2017

24 April 2018

Publication Date:
11 June 2018 (online)

Abstract

Objective The objective of this study is to identify characteristics of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) practice that influence successful retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening.

Study Design In this qualitative study, top, improved, and bottom performing NICUs in the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative were identified based on ROP screening rates and invited to participate. NICU personnel were interviewed using a semistructured questionnaire. Using thematic analysis, key factors that influence ROP screening were identified.

Results Themes found in top performing hospitals include a commitment to quality improvement, a committed ophthalmologist, and a system of double checks. Improved NICUs had a common theme of utilizing telemedicine for exams and identification of eligible neonates on admission. The bottom performing hospital struggled with education and identification of eligible neonates and a lack of a dedicated ophthalmologist.

Conclusion Structure, culture, education, and commitment all contribute to the success of ROP screening in the NICU.