CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Acad Ophthalmol 2018; 10(01): e69-e71
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1653973
Research Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Educational Value of a 3D Printer in Ophthalmology Training

Jawad Arshad*
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Eye Institute, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Richard W. Helms*
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Eye Institute, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Faruk H. Orge
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Eye Institute, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Rony R. Sayegh
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Eye Institute, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

19 November 2017

09 April 2018

Publication Date:
16 May 2018 (online)

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) printers are increasingly being used in medicine for surgical planning, medical education, patient education, research, and device development. We explore the educational value of a 3D printer for trainees in an ophthalmology residency program. A 3D printer was made available to medical students, residents, and clinical and research fellows in the Department of Ophthalmology at Case Western Reserve University. One of the medical students was proficient in the technology and was available to help. Multiple projects were initiated including the manufacturing of slit-lamp cellphone adapters and various interface and integral custom-made parts for research applications. The 3D printer was found to be useful by 20 of 21 trainees surveyed with 17 of 20 saying they would use it after graduation if they had access to one. All the respondents felt that the availability of the technology can contribute to increased innovation in the ophthalmology department. We encourage other ophthalmology departments to experiment with 3D printing as a tool to foster innovation and creativity for trainees.

* Authors Jawad Arshad and Richard W. Helms contributed equally to this work.