Thromb Haemost 1969; 21(02): 287-293
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1653537
Originalarbeiten - Original Articles - Travaux Originaux
Schattauer GmbH

A Study of Possible Causes of Increased Fibrinolytic Activity during Exercise

I. S Menon
1  Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry and Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne and Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
,
F. D Burke
1  Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry and Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne and Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
,
P. A Smith
1  Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry and Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne and Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
,
D. J Newell
1  Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry and Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne and Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
,
H. A Dewar
1  Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry and Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne and Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
10 June 2018 (online)

Summary

The prolonged effect in human volunteers of brief but moderately intense exercise in enhancing fibrinolytic activity has been used to test various parameters which might have been causatively associated with the change.

HMMA, venous blood glucose, body temperature and diastolic blood pressure did not alter significantly at any time. The increase in pulse rate immediately after exercise did not correlate closely with the rise in fibrinolytic activity and disappeared much sooner.

Plasma cortisol and systolic blood pressure had both fallen significantly 1 hr after exercise as compared to their preexercise levels, but there was no significant inverse relationship between these parameters and the changes in fibrinolytic activity.

It is concluded that the parameters measured were unlikely to be responsible for the observed changes in fibrinolytic activity.