CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Reconstr Microsurg Open 2018; 03(01): e21-e24
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1642625
Case Report
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Free Functional Gracilis Muscle Transfer for Reconstruction during Forearm Reimplantation in a Patient with Deep Venous Thrombosis

Daiki Morita
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
,
Hitoshi Nemoto
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
,
Kenta Miyabe
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
,
Seiko Nakae
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
,
Tomoaki Kuroki
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
,
Tomohiro Yasuda
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

30 December 2017

22 February 2018

Publication Date:
23 April 2018 (online)

Abstract

Background Free muscle transfer is the gold standard procedure for functional upper extremity reconstruction. The gracilis muscle is one of the most commonly used donor muscles due to the reduced morbidity of its harvest.

Case We performed a free gracilis muscle flap transfer for functional reconstruction of a forearm after reimplantation in a 62-year-old man with a known deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

Result Perioperative DVT is a potentially fatal complication due to the risk of pulmonary embolism. There were many risk factors in this case for venous thromboembolism around the time of free flap transfer including the length of the operation, intraoperative position changes, and perioperative suspension of anticoagulants. We divided the operation into two stages to reduce operative times, chose a donor site that did not require intraoperative position changes, placed an indwelling temporary filter in the inferior vena cava preoperatively, and continued administration of anticoagulant intraoperatively.

Conclusion With these measures, we safely and successfully performed free gracilis muscle transfer in a patient with DVT.