Semin intervent Radiol 2018; 35(02): 143-150
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1642043
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Pediatric Portal Interventions

Rajiv N. Srinivasa
Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Jeffrey Forris Beecham Chick
Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Noah Chen
Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Joseph J. Gemmete
Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Wael A. Saad
Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Narasimham L. Dasika
Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Ravi N. Srinivasa
Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
04 June 2018 (online)

Pediatric portal interventions pose different challenges when compared with those in adults. Furthermore, the workup and clinical management of children in the preoperative, operative, and postoperative periods are different from that of the adult population with liver disease requiring a portal intervention. Decision-making processes should be executed differently in children based on these factors. Often, pediatric patients requiring portal interventions are transferred to larger academic institutions with standalone children's hospitals and child-specific liver transplant initiatives. Thus, smaller institutions may not have the personnel or systems in place to properly perform these interventions. As an alternative to surgical splenorenal or mesocaval shunts, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) may be performed in children to manage variceal bleeding and ascites. Other portal interventions including portal vein recanalization, variceal sclerotherapy, splenic embolization, and congenital portosystemic shunt embolization may be performed as well.[1]