Semin intervent Radiol 2018; 35(02): 99-104
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1642037
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Hypercoagulable States and Thrombophilias: Risks Relating to Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

Marissa D. Rybstein
Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
,
Maria T. DeSancho
Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
04 June 2018 (online)

Abstract

Inherited and acquired thrombophilias and hypercoagulable states, such as active cancer, estrogen-induced, autoimmune disorders, major surgery, hospitalization, and trauma, are well-known risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The effect of these on recurrent VTE is different for each specific risk factor. The major risk factors affecting VTE recurrence include the presence of active cancer and an unprovoked first VTE. In addition, the use of combined female hormones in a woman with a previous history of estrogen-related VTE is a major risk factor for VTE recurrence. The extent of influence of inherited thrombophilia on the risk of recurrence is controversial. Conversely, the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, specifically triple positive carriers, appears to increase the risk of VTE recurrence. Understanding the rates of recurrent VTE in a patient and the individual risk of bleeding is important in determining the duration of anticoagulation therapy.