Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2018; 31(04): 298-303
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1639599
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Temporary Segmental Distraction in a Dog with Degenerative Lumbosacral Stenosis

Nicole Willems
Division of Orthopaedics/Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht, The Netherlands
,
Roel F.M.R. Kersten
Department of Orthopaedics, Diakonessenhuis, Diakonessenhuis, Zeist, The Netherlands
,
Steven M. van Gaalen
Department of Orthopaedics, Diakonessenhuis, Diakonessenhuis, Zeist, The Netherlands
,
F. Cumhur Öner
Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands
,
Gustav J. Strijkers
Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
,
Stefanie Veraa
Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht, The Netherlands
,
Martijn Beukers
Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht, The Netherlands
,
Marianna A. Tryfonidou
Division of Orthopaedics/Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht, The Netherlands
,
Björn P. Meij
Division of Orthopaedics/Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht, The Netherlands
› Author Affiliations
Funding The financial contribution of the Dutch Arthritis Foundation (LLP22) and donation of the pedicle screws and rods by DePuy Synthes are gratefully acknowledged.
Further Information

Publication History

28 March 2017

13 February 2018

Publication Date:
02 June 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objectives Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is characterized by intervertebral disc degeneration and causes lower back pain in dogs. Temporary distraction in rabbit models with induced intervertebral disc degeneration showed signs of intervertebral disc repair. In the present study, we assessed safety and efficacy of temporary segmental distraction in a dog with clinical signs of DLSS.

Methods Distraction of the lumbosacral junction by pedicle screw–rod fixation was applied in a 5-year-old Greyhound with DLSS and evaluated by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and force plate analysis before and after distraction.

Results Safe distraction of the lumbosacral junction was demonstrated, with improvement of clinical signs after removal of the distraction device. Signal intensity of the intervertebral disc showed no changes over time. T2 value was highest directly after removal of the distraction device but decreased by 10% of the preoperative value at 9 months of follow-up. Disc height decreased (8%) immediately after removal of the distraction device, but recovered to the initial value. A decrease in the pelvic/thoracic propulsive force during pedicle screw–rod fixation and distraction was demonstrated, which slowly increased by 4% compared with the initial value.

Clinical significance Temporary pedicle screw–rod fixation in combination with distraction in a dog with DLSS was safe, improved clinical signs and retained disc height at 9 months of follow-up.

Author Contributions

SMvG, FCÖ, MAT and BPM participated in the study conception. All authors were involved in the study design and acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, and in the drafting and revision of the manuscript. All authors have read and approved the final manuscript.