Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 1991; 4(04): 120-131
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1633266
Original Research
Schattauer GmbH

The Use of High-Speed Videography to Generate Angle-Time and Angle-Angle Diagrams for the Study of Equine Locomotion

L. J. Martinez-del Campo
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
,
C. N. Kobluk
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
,
Nancy Greer
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
,
Ava M. Trent
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
,
Lela June Stoner
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
,
L. Wickstrom
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
,
Deborah Loch
1   From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospitals, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received for publication 21 November 1990

Publication Date:
06 February 2018 (online)

Summary

Introduction

High-speed videography was used to generate angle-time and angle-angle diagrams to provide the basis for a better subjective and objective understanding of the locomotor function of the horse. Intra- and interlimb coordination patterns were analyzed in a group of ten clinically sound racing Thoroughbreds. For lateral video recording, reflective markers were glued over the axis of rotation of the fore- and hindlimb joints of the ten horses. All horses were filmed simultaneously from both sides (right and left). Means and standard deviations were calculated for the minimum, the maximum and the range of motion values for the angle excursions of each joint. Angle-time and angle-angle diagrams were highly repeatable over the eight to nine strides videotaped for each horse and showed a very characteristic shape with minor variations between individual horses. When comparing right versus left sides, horses exhibited varying levels of significant asymmetry.