Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2006; 19(01): 14-19
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1632968
Clinical Communication
Schattauer GmbH

Clinical application of intraoperative skeletal traction in the dog

G. L. Rovesti
1  Veterinary Clinic M. E. Miller, Cavriago, Reggio Emilia, Italy
,
A. Margini
1  Veterinary Clinic M. E. Miller, Cavriago, Reggio Emilia, Italy
,
F. Cappellari
2  Department of Animal Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine of Turin, Grugliasco, Turin, Italy
,
B. Peirone
2  Department of Animal Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine of Turin, Grugliasco, Turin, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 04 October 2004

Accepted 05 March 2005

Publication Date:
08 February 2018 (online)

Summary

The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a method for pre-operative and intra-operative traction for reduction of fractures of the appendicular skeleton. Traction was used in 24 diaphyseal fractures in 21 dogs. For each dog, the data pertaining to signalment, limb circumference, fracture type, interval between fracture and surgery, and the traction modalities were recorded. In patients with a latency between trauma and surgery of less than three days, the duration of traction required to realign the bone segments was shorter than that required for older fractures (P = 0.02). Intraoperative malalignments were corrected by manoeuvres performed with the traction stand. Once realigned, fracture segments were kept stable for prolonged periods, without the need for a surgical assistant. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated for fracture reduction and axial alignment. Postoperative alignment was judged excellent in 21 fractures and good in three fractures. Fractures were stabilized using external skeletal fixation (n=10), plates (n=11) or locked nails (n=3), depending on the fracture type. The use of the technique was straightforward and easily applied in a surgical setting. However, its use requires careful application because of the potential for iatrogenic tissue damage.