Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2000; 13(01): 39-43
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1632628
Clinical Communication
Schattauer GmbH

Rectangular Recession Trochleoplasty for Treatment of Patellar Luxation in Dogs and Cats

K. W. Talcott
1  Affiliated Veterinary Specialists, Orange Park, Florida, USA
,
R. L. Goring
1  Affiliated Veterinary Specialists, Orange Park, Florida, USA
,
J. J. de Haan
1  Affiliated Veterinary Specialists, Orange Park, Florida, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 18 June 1999

Accepted 07 October 1999

Publication Date:
09 February 2018 (online)

Summary

Trochleoplasty is a fundamental component of surgical treatment for patients with inadequate trochlear depth associated with patellar luxation. Traditional methods of trochleoplasty include trochlear resection, chondroplasty and wedge recession trochleoplasty. Each technique has its benefits and limitations. Rectangular recession trochleoplasty (RRT) is a new technique that builds upon the strengths of its predecessors while minimizing their limitations. Rectangular recession utilizes a rectangular osteochondral autograft that is harvested from the trochlear groove and replaced into its recipient bed. Unlike wedge recession, the autograft surfaces are compressed and buttressed within the recipient bed. resulting in secure implantation of the autograft. Rectangular recession achieves maximal preservation of hyaline articular cartilage while minimizing exposure of abrasive subchondral bone. Rectangular recession can be performed on dogs and cats as small as 3 kg and has been clinically effective in treating over 100 cases of patellar luxation.

Trochleoplasty is an important surgical procedure for treatment of patellar luxation in the dog and cat. The objective of any trochleoplasty technique is to achieve adequate trochlear depth and width while optimizing preservation of hyaline articular cartilage. Rectangular recession trochleoplasty (RRT) is a new technique that achieves adequate trochlear width and depth utilizing a securely “press-fit” osteochondral autograft that achieves maximal preservation of hyaline articular cartilage.

This work was presented at the 26th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Orthopedic Society, March 4, 1999, Sun Valley, Idaho, USA