Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 1999; 12(02): 74-77
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1632466
Clinical Communication
Schattauer GmbH

Bone Plate Removal in Dogs and Cats

T. D. Emmerson
1   From The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, North Mymms, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
,
P. Muir
1   From The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, North Mymms, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 04 December 1997

Accepted 29 January 1998

Publication Date:
08 February 2018 (online)

Summary

The medical records and radiographs of 255 consecutive bone plate applications were reviewed. Thirteen percent of the bone plates were removed. Removal of bone plates was most often performed for carpal, tibial, femoral and humeral constructs. Only 9.4% of plates were applied to the tibia and the tarsus, but 27% of plate removals were performed for these skeletal regions.

The most common reason for plate removal was construct instability. Factors often associated with unstable constructs included multiple limb injuries, fracture comminution, empty screw holes, engagement of an inadequate number of cortices proximal or distal to the fracture and failure to use cancellous bone autograft. Other reasons for plate removal included infection, soft tissue irritation, and chronic lameness.

A series of 255 consecutive bone plate applications were reviewed. Thirteen percent of bone plates were removed. Construct instability was the most common reason for plate removal. Bone plates were also removed because of soft tissue irritation, infection, and chronic lameness. Plate removal was most often performed for tibial and tarsal constructs.