Thromb Haemost 1998; 80(06): 874-877
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1615380
Letters to the Editor
Schattauer GmbH

Hyperhomocysteinemia and Venous Thrombosis: A Meta-analysis

Martin den Heijer
1  Department of Hematology, Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague
,
Frits R. Rosendaal
2  Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Department of Hematology, University Hospital Leiden
,
Henk J. Blom
3  Laboratory of Paediatrics and Neurology, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands
,
Wim B. J. Gerrits
1  Department of Hematology, Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague
,
Gerard M. J. Bos
1  Department of Hematology, Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague
› Author Affiliations
Present addresses: Dr. Gerard M. J. Bos is presently a fellow of the Dutch Cancer Foundation.
Further Information

Publication History

Received 19 March 1998

Accepted after resubmission 20 August 1998

Publication Date:
07 December 2017 (online)

Summary

Hyperhomocysteinemia is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis and vascular disease. Until the early nineties the relationship with venous thrombosis was controversial. At this moment ten case-control studies on venous thrombosis are published. We performed a meta-analysis of these reports.

We performed a MEDLINE-search from 1984 through June 1997 on the keywords “homocysteine” or “hyperhomocysteinemia” and “venous thrombosis”, which yielded ten eligible case-control studies.

We found a pooled estimate of the odds ratio of 2.5 (95% CI 1.8-3.5) for a fasting plasma homocysteine concentration above the 95th percentile or mean plus two standard deviations calculated from the distribution of the respective control groups. For the post-methionine increase in homocysteine concentration we found a pooled estimate of 2.6 (95% CI 1.6-4.4).

These data from case-control studies support hyperhomocysteinemia as a risk factor for venous thrombosis. Further research should focus on the pathophysiology of this relationship and on the clinical effects of reducing homocysteine levels by vitamin supplementation.