J Pediatr Neurol 2019; 17(01): 022-027
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1608009
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Can Neonatal Hypoglycemia be Considered a Risk Factor for Development of Acquired Arachnoid Cysts?

Matteo Vitali
1  Neurosurgical Unit, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Nazionale SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria, Italy
,
Andrea Cattalani
1  Neurosurgical Unit, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Nazionale SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria, Italy
2  Department of Clinical–Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, Neurosurgery, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italy
,
Vincenzo Maria Grasso
1  Neurosurgical Unit, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Nazionale SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria, Italy
,
Gian Paolo Longo
1  Neurosurgical Unit, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Nazionale SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria, Italy
,
Donatella Sgubin
1  Neurosurgical Unit, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Nazionale SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria, Italy
,
Maurizio Cremonte
3  Department of Child Neuropsychiatry, C. Arrigo Hospital, Alessandria, Italy
,
Andrea Barbanera
1  Neurosurgical Unit, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Nazionale SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Alessandria, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

22 February 2017

25 September 2017

Publication Date:
06 November 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are intra-arachnoid fluid collections and may be classified as primary or secondary in nature. Neonatal hypoglycemia (NH) is a common, life-threatening metabolic disorder in infants. We present the case of a term infant who suffered severe NH within 72 hours after birth and subsequently developed an acquired Sylvian AC.

A child of 13 months of age, with history of severe NH within 72 hours after birth, was admitted after two generalized seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed dimensional increase of a left Sylvian AC, not present on imaging on day one of life but revealed with a second MRI at 16 days of age. The timeline of events suggests some kind of correlation between the newborn's metabolic disorder, appearance of the AC, and its progressive expansion. We speculate that NH's organic consequences, i.e., cortical and white matter atrophy might have favored some kind of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) dynamic alteration and AC development in our patient. Further structured studies are needed to confirm our hypothesis and reveal NH as a risk factor in the pathogenesis of ACs.