Seminars in Plastic Surgery 2017; 31(04): 214-221
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607201
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Osseointegrated Implants and Prosthetic Reconstruction Following Skull Base Surgery

Shirley Hu1, Demetri Arnaoutakis2, Sameep Kadakia1, Allison Vest3, Raja Sawhney4, Yadranko Ducic5
  • 1Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York
  • 2Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
  • 3Medical Art Prosthetics, LLC, McKinney, Texas
  • 4Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
  • 5Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic Surgery Associates, Fort Worth, Texas
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
25 October 2017 (online)

Abstract

Rehabilitation following ablative skull base surgery remains a challenging task, given the complexity of the anatomical region, despite the recent advances in reconstructive surgery. Remnant defects following resection of skull base tumors are often not amenable to primary closure. As such, numerous techniques have been described for reconstruction, including local rotational muscle flaps, pedicled flaps with skin paddle, or even free tissue transfer. However, not all patients are appropriate surgical candidates and therefore may instead benefit from nonsurgical options for functional and aesthetic restoration. Osseointegrated implants and biocompatible prostheses provide a viable alternative for such a patient population. The purpose of this review serves to highlight current options for prosthetic rehabilitation of skull base defects and describe their indications, advantages, and disadvantages.