J Pediatr Infect Dis 2018; 13(01): 037-041
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606281
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Evaluation of 18S rRNA PCR in the Diagnosis of Neonatal Fungal Sepsis

Pallavi Sonika
Department of Pediatrics, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India
,
Geeta Gathwala
Department of Pediatrics, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India
,
Dhara B. Dhaulakhandi
Department of Biotechnology & Molecular Medicine, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India
,
Nidhi Goel
Department of Microbiology, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India
,
Sandeep Lather
Department of Pediatrics, Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

11 May 2017

17 July 2017

Publication Date:
11 September 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Neonatal fungal infections constitute a significant disease burden in India. In the absence of an ideal diagnostic test for the detection of fungal sepsis, the management of sepsis remains enigmatic. At present, blood culture is the method of choice for neonatal fungal sepsis, but it is not 100% sensitive. Together with the requirement for prolonged incubation, blood cultures are of limited utility in investigating neonates for invasive fungal infections, and especially for guiding initial therapy. For quite some time, molecular methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting microorganisms are gaining prominence in clinical practice, particularly due to their precision, specificity, sensitivity, and shorter reporting time. Amplification of the 18S rRNA subunit gene by PCR from the DNA extracted from patient's blood specifically identifies the causative organism at least at genus level. Here, we evaluate the diagnostic utility of 18S rRNA PCR in neonatal fungal sepsis as part of a prospective cohort study in a tertiary health care setting.