CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2018; 22(01): 055-059
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1602702
Original Research
Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Adenotonsillar Hypertrophy in Pre-School Children with Sickle Cell Disease and Diagnostic Accuracy of the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children

Carlos Rodolfo Tavares de Góis
1  Department of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE, Brazil
,
Jeferson Sampaio D'Ávila
1  Department of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE, Brazil
,
Rosana Cipolotti
1  Department of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE, Brazil
,
Amanda da Silva Lira
2  Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil
,
Ana Letícia Leite Silva
1  Department of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

12 November 2016

18 March 2017

Publication Date:
02 May 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Introduction Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is more common in children with sickle cell disease, and can lead to sleep-disordered breathing.

Objectives To determine the frequency of adenotonsillar hypertrophy in pre-school children with sickle cell disease and assess the diagnostic accuracy of the sleep-disordered breathing subscale in the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children.

Method Observational study with a group of 48 children with sickle cell disease and a control group of 35 children without the disease. The children underwent oropharingoscopy and video nasal endoscopy. The parents and/or guardians answered the questions of the subscale.

Results Adenotonsillar hypertrophy was observed in 25% of the children in the study group, and in 20% of the children in the control group, with no statistical difference between the groups. The subscale score ranged from 3 to 11 in both groups. There was a statistical significance in the study group. The average was 4.79 (standard deviation [SD] ± 2.50), with 4.19 (SD ± 1.72) among the children without adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and 6.5 (SD ± 3.40) among the children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. There was also a statistical significance in the control group. The average was 5.23 (SD ± 2.81), with 4.44 (SD ± 2.2) among the children without adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and 7.87 (SD ± 2.89) among the children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

Conclusion Adenotonsillar hypertrophy was not associated with sickle cell disease in pre-school children. The subscale of sleep-disordered breathing in the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children was a useful tool for the diagnostic suspicion of adenotonsillar hypertrophy in children in this age group.