J Knee Surg 2018; 31(02): 202
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1602137
Letter to the Editor
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Comment on: “The ‘Hoop’ Plate for Posterior Bicondylar Shear Tibial Plateau Fractures: Description of a New Surgical Technique”

Ashwani Soni
1  Department of Orthopaedics, Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh, India
,
Ravi K. Gupta
1  Department of Orthopaedics, Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

27 January 2017

09 March 2017

Publication Date:
02 May 2017 (eFirst)

Response to “Comment on: The ‘Hoop’ Plate for Posterior Bicondylar Shear Tibial Plateau Fractures: Description of a New Surgical Technique”

We read with interest the article “The ‘Hoop’ Plate for Posterior Bicondylar Shear Tibial Plateau Fractures: Description of a New Surgical Technique” by Giordano et al.[1] We appreciate the authors for their work; however, we want to add a tip in the technique described by the authors.

The authors suggested in their article the fixation of posterior condylar fractures of proximal tibia with hoop plate. The authors also suggested putting a reduction clamp on anterior edges of plate and tightening it to make the plate seat over the posterior rim and edge of tibial plateau. The authors advised this fixation technique in shear as well as in comminuted fractures in same manner. In fact, these two types of fractures are completely different and required different fixation technique. The comminuted fractures if compressed with reduction clamp will lead to crushing. We suggest that in case of comminuted fracture, the plate should be placed without giving any excessive compression, while in case of shear fractures, where comminution is not present, compression with reduction clamp should be given.