CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · AJP Rep 2017; 07(01): e44-e48
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1599123
Case Report
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Opportunities to Foster Efficient Communication in Labor and Delivery Using Simulation

Kay Daniels
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
2  Department of Pediatrics, Safety Learning Laboratory for Neonatal and Maternal Care, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
Colleen Hamilton
2  Department of Pediatrics, Safety Learning Laboratory for Neonatal and Maternal Care, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
Susan Crowe
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
2  Department of Pediatrics, Safety Learning Laboratory for Neonatal and Maternal Care, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
Steven S. Lipman
2  Department of Pediatrics, Safety Learning Laboratory for Neonatal and Maternal Care, Stanford University, Stanford, California
3  Department of Anesthesiology, Pain and Perioperative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Louis P. Halamek
2  Department of Pediatrics, Safety Learning Laboratory for Neonatal and Maternal Care, Stanford University, Stanford, California
4  Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Henry C. Lee
2  Department of Pediatrics, Safety Learning Laboratory for Neonatal and Maternal Care, Stanford University, Stanford, California
4  Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

04 August 2016

09 January 2017

Publication Date:
28 February 2017 (online)

Abstract

Introduction Communication errors are an important contributing factor in adverse outcomes in labor and delivery (L&D) units. The objective of this study was to identify common lapses in verbal communication using simulated obstetrical scenarios and propose alternative formats for communication.

Methods Health care professionals in L&D participated in three simulated clinical scenarios. Scenarios were recorded and reviewed to identify questions repeated within and across scenarios. Questions that were repeated more than once due to ineffective communication were identified. The frequency with which the questions were asked across simulations was identified.

Results Questions were commonly repeated both within and across 27 simulated scenarios. The median number of questions asked was 27 per simulated scenario. Commonly repeated questions focused on three general topics: (1) historical data/information (i.e., estimated gestational age), (2) maternal clinical status (i.e., estimated blood loss), and (3) personnel (i.e., “Has anesthesiologist been called?”).

Conclusion Inefficient verbal communication exists in the process of transferring information during obstetric emergencies. These findings can inform improved training and development of information displays to improve teamwork and communication. A visual display that can report static historical information and specific dynamic clinical data may facilitate optimal human performance.