CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurol Surg Rep 2017; 78(01): e12-e14
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1597588
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Neurofibromatosis Type 2 Patient with a Novel MRI-Compatible Auditory Brainstem Implant

Matthew Shew
1  Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas School Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, United States
,
Judson Bertsch
2  Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kansas School Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, United States
,
Paul Camarata
3  Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kansas School Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, United States
,
Hinrich Staecker
1  Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas School Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

05 August 2016

07 November 2016

Publication Date:
14 February 2017 (online)

Abstract

Auditory brainstem implantation has become a key technique for the rehabilitation of hearing in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. The nature of this devastating genetic disease requires ongoing MRI for the patient's lifespan. Today, most auditory brainstem implants require removal of the magnet that connects the internal device to the external speech processor to undergo imaging as their disease progresses. Patients have the option of having a short procedure to have the magnet taken out and replaced each time, or alternately using a headband to secure the processor over the receiver coil of the internal device. Novel magnet technology has led to the development of a freely rotating magnet that can be used inside the magnetic field of an MRI scanner without losing magnet strength and without being displaced from the body of the device. We report one of the first patients implanted with a Med-El Synchrony ABI in the United States who subsequently underwent successful imaging with MRI 1.5 tesla to follow for other existing schwannomas.

Note

The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.