Synlett 2017; 28(19): 2561-2564
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1591676
cluster
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

C–S Bond Alkynylation of Diaryl Sulfoxides with Terminal Alkynes by Means of a Palladium–NHC Catalyst

Yuto Yoshida
Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan   Email: yori@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp
,
Keisuke Nogi
Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan   Email: yori@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp
,
Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan   Email: yori@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp
› Author Affiliations
This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP16H01019, JP16H04109, JP16H06887, as well as JST ACT-C Grant Number JPMJCR12ZE, Japan. H.Y. thanks Japan Association for Chemical Innovation, Tokuyama Science Foundation, and The Naito Foundation for financial support.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 02 October 2017

Accepted: 27 October 2017

Publication Date:
08 November 2017 (online)


Published as part of the Cluster C–O Activation

Abstract

Sonogashira–Hagihara-type alkynylation of diaryl sulfoxides with unactivated terminal alkynes has been developed. With a combination of a palladium–NHC catalyst and LiOtBu as a base, a series of diaryl sulfoxides were converted into the alkynylated products via C–S bond cleavage.

Supporting Information

 
  • References and Notes


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