J Pediatr Intensive Care 2017; 06(01): 019-027
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1584910
Review Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Pediatric Emergency Care in Disaster-Affected Areas: A Firsthand Perspective after Typhoons Bopha and Haiyan in the Philippines

Nicole Shilkofski
1  Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
2  Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Modupe Agueh
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Malini Fonseka
4  Sinai Hospital Lifebridge Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Amirah Tan
5  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
,
Joselito Rosauro Cembrano
6  Department of Surgery, Davao Medical School Foundation, Davao, Mindanao, Philippines
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

15 August 2015

15 February 2016

Publication Date:
01 July 2016 (eFirst)

Abstract

Disasters are defined as man-made or natural causes that disrupt a population and cause widespread human, material, economic, or environmental losses, exceeding that population's capacity to cope using its own resources. This review highlights the epidemiology and disease patterns in disasters, with specific application to the care of children in the austere environments created in the aftermath of disasters. The review also attempts to describe the experience from a firsthand field hospital perspective of a multinational team in caring for patients in the aftermath of two natural disasters in the Philippines, during both Typhoon Bopha and Typhoon Haiyan. In doing so, we will place these experiences in the context of the current literature on the subject of pediatric management during disaster emergencies and describe lessons learned to refine team approaches and patient care methodologies. The review also discusses methods for improvement in emergency preparedness for disasters, with specific mention of the roles of telemedicine and just-in-time simulation training, when feasible. Lastly, it will review the importance of community and military collaboration and planning for aftercare post-departure of foreign medical teams.