J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2016; 77(05): 419-429
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1584197
Review Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Treatment of Temporal Bone Fractures

Rodney C. Diaz
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California, United States
,
Brian Cervenka
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California, United States
,
Hilary A. Brodie
1  Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
02 June 2016 (online)

Abstract

Traumatic injury to the temporal bone can lead to significant morbidity or mortality and knowledge of the pertinent anatomy, pathophysiology of injury, and appropriate management strategies is critical for successful recovery and rehabilitation of such injured patients. Most temporal bone fractures are caused by motor vehicle accidents. Temporal bone fractures are best classified as either otic capsule sparing or otic capsule disrupting-type fractures, as such classification correlates well with risk of concomitant functional complications. The most common complications of temporal bone fractures are facial nerve injury, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and hearing loss. Assessment of facial nerve function as soon as possible following injury greatly facilitates clinical decision making. Use of prophylactic antibiotics in the setting of CSF leak is controversial; however, following critical analysis and interpretation of the existing classic and contemporary literature, we believe its use is absolutely warranted.