Amer J Perinatol 2016; 33(07): 708-714
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1571326
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Increased Risk for Ophthalmic Complications in Patients with a History of Preterm Delivery

Asnat Walfisch
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Roy Kessous
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Ehud Davidson
2  Soroka University Medical Center, Clalit Health Services (Southern District), Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Ruslan Sergienko
3  Department of Public Health, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Ofer Beharier
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Eyal Sheiner
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

08 September 2015

03 December 2015

Publication Date:
13 February 2016 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective Spontaneous preterm deliveries (PTDs) have been consistently associated with maternal vascular complications. We aimed to investigate an association between PTD and subsequent maternal ophthalmic morbidity.

Study Design In this population-based cohort study, we included all singleton deliveries occurring between 1988 and 2013. We excluded women with known ophthalmic disease. The exposure was at least one pregnancy with PTD. Outcomes included different maternal ophthalmic morbidity. The cumulative incidence and adjusted hazard ratios were assessed using a Kaplan–Meier survival curve and Cox hazards models.

Results Of the 105,018 patients included, 17,600 (16.7%) delivered preterm. Patients with a history of PTD (both induced and spontaneous) had higher rates of ophthalmic complications (odds ratio [OR]: 2.12; confidence interval [CI]: 1.6–2.7; p < 0.001), specifically diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma (OR: 4.79 and 2.48, respectively). A linear association was found between the number of previous PTDs and ophthalmic complications (0.2% for no PTD; 0.4% for one PTD; 0.6% for two or more PTDs; p < 0.001) and for early and late PTD (p < 0.001). A Cox model revealed an independent association between PTD and ophthalmic complications (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.6–2.9).

Conclusion A history of PTD is an independent risk factor for ophthalmic morbidity.

Note

Prof. Eyal Sheiner had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.


Supplementary Material