Journal of Pediatric Epilepsy 2016; 05(01): 001-006
DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1567849
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Long-Term Outcome of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Therapy in Young Children with Intractable Epilepsy

Michael Kohrman
1   Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, Illinois, United States
,
Lubov Romantseva
2   Department of Pediatrics, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, United States
,
James Tonsgard
1   Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, Illinois, United States
,
David Frim
3   Department of Neurosurgery, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, Illinois, United States
,
Bakhtiar Yamini
3   Department of Neurosurgery, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, Illinois, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

18 October 2012

21 February 2015

Publication Date:
21 December 2015 (online)

Abstract

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is approved by FDA for treatment of intractable epilepsy in children over 12 years of age. We assessed the efficacy of VNS therapy in younger children. The study was a retrospective review of the medical records of medically refractory epilepsy patients under 12 years old at VNS implantation. Out of 42 patients studied, 28 had at least 50% decrease in seizure frequency, one-half of patients had 75% decrease in seizures, and 7% became seizure-free. A total 69% of patients reported improved mood and alertness. Complication rate was 7%. Age at VNS implantation, prior duration of epilepsy, electroencelphographic focality, and etiology of epilepsy did not influence the outcome (p > 0.05). Our cohort demonstrated a lasting benefit of VNS therapy over 5 years, including seizure reduction and improved mood and alertness. VNS is a safe and effective adjunctive therapy for young children with medically intractable epilepsy.