J Pediatr Infect Dis 2007; 02(02): 089-094
DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1557030
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

Epidemiology of infant salmonellosis in Michigan: Records of 1995–2001

M. Mokhtar Arshad
a  Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
b  National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
,
Melinda J. Wilkins
a  Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
c  Bureau of Epidemiology, Michigan Department of Community Health, Lansing, MI, USA
,
Frances P. Downes
d  Bureau of Laboratories, Michigan Department of Community Health, Lansing, MI, USA
,
M. Hossein Rahbar
e  Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
,
Ronald J. Erskine
a  Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
,
Mathew L. Boulton
f  School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
,
Muhammad Younus
b  National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
e  Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
,
Mahdi A. Saeed
a  Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
b  National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
e  Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
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Publikationsverlauf

08. November 2006

12. März 2007

Publikationsdatum:
28.Juli 2015 (online)

Abstract

We conducted an epidemiologic study on the incidence of Salmonella infections and the associated risk factors in children aged <1 in the state of Michigan. Data on laboratory-confirmed cases of salmonellosis from 1995–2001 were abstracted from the records of Michigan Department of Community Health. We computed the incidence of the disease by sex, race, and area of residence and analyzed the relationships between selected demographic characteristics and Salmonella infection using Poisson regression analysis. Based on a total of 690 cases, an overall incidence of 73.3/100,000, with an incidence of 84.3/100,000 in male children and 64.9/100,000 in female children, were found. The final covariate-adjusted Poisson model showed that children aged 1–5 months are at higher risk for salmonellosis compared to children aged 6–11 months (RR: 1.80, CI: 1.54–2.10), African-American children are at higher risk than their Caucasian counterparts (RR: 2.63, CI: 2.16–3.19), and male children more commonly represented among cases (RR: 1.30, CI: 1.12–1.51). These findings should be considered by healthcare authorities in Michigan and in states with similar population demographics to investigate possible risk factors that may be associated with the high incidence of salmonellosis in African-American children and in children <6 months.