J Pediatr Infect Dis 2007; 02(02): 105-108
DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1557029
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

Slow progression of human immunodeficiency infection in a 14-year-old boy born to an HIV-infected mother

Danaya Chansinghakul
a  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Rama IV Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
,
Woraman Waidab
a  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Rama IV Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
,
Thitikul Hiranraj
a  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Rama IV Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
,
Yodporn Mayurasakorn
a  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Rama IV Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
,
Sarina Hemungkorn
b  First Year Undergraduate, Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of California at Santa Barbara, USA
,
Usa Thisyakorn
a  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Rama IV Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

05 January 2007

08 January 2007

Publication Date:
28 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

Vertically infected children may progress rapidly to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or progression of disease is much slower as demonstrated in our case report. This is a report of a 14-year-old boy with vertically transmitted slow progress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pulmonary tuberculosis presented with a low-grade fever, chronic cough and weight loss for 2 months. He was treated with antituberculous drugs followed by highly active antiretrovirals with dramatic improvements. The prognosis of pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has improved with more widespread availability and use of combination antiretrovirals. These findings have implications for health, education, and other support-service provision. Many services can aid in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and the care of HIV-infected mothers and their children.