J Pediatr Infect Dis 2008; 03(03): 175-179
DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1556982
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

Has the number of cases of pediatric empyema increased in North-West Spain?

Federico Martinón-Torres
a  Servicio de Criticos, Intermedios y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Universidad de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
,
Silvia Dosil Gallardo
a  Servicio de Criticos, Intermedios y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Universidad de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
,
Laura Pérez Gay
a  Servicio de Criticos, Intermedios y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Universidad de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
,
Fernando Alvez
b  Servicio de Infectología Pediátrica, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
,
Antonio Rodriguez Núñez
a  Servicio de Criticos, Intermedios y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Universidad de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
,
Jose María Martinón Sánchez
a  Servicio de Criticos, Intermedios y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Universidad de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

19 September 2007

10 April 2008

Publication Date:
28 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

Clinicians in Spain perceive an increase in the incidence of pediatric empyema. The available objective information is limited because it is a condition, for which there is no specific active epidemiological surveillance. This study aims to determine and evaluate the incidence of empyema of infectious origin, especially pneumococcal empyema, among children in Galicia (North-West of Spain). A retrospective search of all pediatrics cases of empyema from 1996 to present (May 2006) in Galicia (North-West of Spain) was performed using the official hospital admissions database. A total of 165 patients were identified, showing an increase in the incidence of empyema (1.02 cases/100,000 children in 1996 to 7.35 cases/100,000 children in 2005) and a decrease in the mean age of the patients affected [(7.25 (6.3) years in 1996 to 3.7 (3) in 2005]. This increase in the incidence of empyema started before the antipneumococcal vaccine became available and the reason for it remains unknown. This situation would justify the establishment of prospective systems for the surveillance and control of empyema.