Int J Sports Med 2015; 36(11): 900-905
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1398646
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The Effect of Performing Bi- and Unilateral Row Exercises on Core Muscle Activation

A. Saeterbakken
1  Faculty of Teacher Education and Sport, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway
,
V. Andersen
1  Faculty of Teacher Education and Sport, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway
,
A. Brudeseth
1  Faculty of Teacher Education and Sport, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway
,
H. Lund
1  Faculty of Teacher Education and Sport, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway
,
M. S. Fimland
2  Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
3  Hysnes Rehabilitation Center, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
› Institutsangaben
Weitere Informationen

Publikationsverlauf



accepted after revision 02. Januar 2015

Publikationsdatum:
02. Juli 2015 (online)

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to compare core muscle activation in 3 different row exercises (free-weight bent-over row, seated cable row and machine row) performed unilaterally and bilaterally, at matched effort levels. 15 resistance-trained men (26.0±4.4 years, 81.0±9.5 kg, 1.81±0.07 m) performed the exercises in randomized order. For erector spinae and multifidus, EMG activities in unilateral machine- and cable row were 60–63% and 74–78% of the bilateral performance (P≤0.036). For external oblique, the EMG activities recorded during bilateral exercises were 37–41% of the unilateral performance (P≤0.010). In unilateral cable- and machine rows, the EMG activities in external oblique and multifidus were 50–57% and 70–73% of the free-weight row (P≤0.002). In bilateral free-weight row, EMG activity in erector spinae was greater than bilateral machine- (+34%, P=0.004) and unilateral free-weight rows (+12%, P=0.016). For rectus abdominis there were no significant differences between conditions. In conclusion, 1) free-weight row provided greater EMG activity in erector spinae (bilaterally and unilaterally) and multifidus (unilaterally) than machine row; 2) unilateral performance of exercises activated the external oblique more than bilateral performance, regardless of exercise; and 3) generally bilateral performance of exercises provided higher erector spinae and multifidus EMG activity compared to unilateral performance.