Int J Sports Med
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1398574
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The Effects of Aquatic Plyometric Training on Repeated Jumps, Drop Jumps and Muscle Damage

A. Jurado-Lavanant
Laboratory of Human Movement, Universidad de Málaga, Andalucía-Tech, Malaga, Spain
,
J. R. Alvero-Cruz
Sport Medicine School, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Málaga, Andalucía-Tech, Malaga, Spain
,
F. Pareja-Blanco
Centro de Investigación en Rendimiento Físico y Deportivo, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain
,
C. Melero-Romero
Andalusian Center of Sports Medicine, Tourism and Sports Counseling, Malaga, Spain
,
D. Rodríguez-Rosell
Centro de Investigación en Rendimiento Físico y Deportivo, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain
,
J. C. Fernandez-Garcia
Faculty of Education Sciences, Universidad de Málaga, Andalucía-Tech, Malaga, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 02 December 2014

Publication Date:
22 September 2015 (eFirst)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of land- vs. aquatic based plyometric training programs on the drop jump, repeated jump performance and muscle damage. Sixty-five male students were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: aquatic plyometric training group (APT), plyometric training group (PT) and control group (CG). Both experimental groups trained twice a week for 10 weeks performing the same number of sets and total jumps. The following variables were measured prior to, halfway through and after the training programs: creatine kinase (CK) concentration, maximal height during a drop jump from the height of 30 (DJ30) and 50 cm (DJ50), and mean height during a repeated vertical jump test (RJ). The training program resulted in a significant increase (P<0.01–0.001) in RJ, DJ30, and DJ50 for PT, whereas neither APT nor CG reached any significant improvement APT showed likely/possibly improvements on DJ30 and DJ50, respectively. Greater intra-group Effect Size in CK was found for PT when compared to APT. In conclusion, although APT seems to be a safe alternative method for reducing the stress produced on the musculoskeletal system by plyometric training, PT produced greater gains on reactive jumps performance than APT.