JAO 2014; 07(01): e003-e007
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1396084
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Ophthalmology Residents' Perspectives Regarding Disclosure of Resident Involvement in Ophthalmic Surgery

Ardalan Aminlari
1  Department of Ophthalmology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
,
Ingrid U. Scott
1  Department of Ophthalmology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
2  Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
,
Paul B. Greenberg
3  Section of Ophthalmology, VA Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island
4  Division of Ophthalmology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
23 December 2014 (online)

  

Abstract

Objective To investigate ophthalmology residents' perspectives regarding disclosure to patients of resident involvement in surgery.

Methods An anonymous survey was constructed on http://www.surveymonkey.com. An email containing an explanation of the study, an invitation to residents to participate, and the survey link was sent to the coordinator of each ophthalmology residency program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and coordinators were asked to forward the email to all residents in their program.

Results Out of the 1,374 residents to whom the survey was sent, 262 (19.1%) responded; 25.9% (66/262) of respondents reported their programs have an established policy regarding disclosure of resident involvement in surgery; 53.0% (35/66) of respondents at programs with an established disclosure policy identified the resident as having primary responsibility for disclosure, while 61.9% (117/189) of respondents at programs without an established disclosure policy indicated the attending physician should have primary responsibility for disclosure. Among respondents at programs with resident-run clinics, 87.8% (72/82) at programs with an established disclosure policy identified the resident as having primary responsibility of disclosure, and 62.0% (88/141) at programs without an established disclosure policy reported the resident should be responsible for disclosure.

Conclusion A minority of ophthalmology residency programs employ policies for disclosure of resident involvement in surgery. There is a lack of consistency between respondents at programs with versus without an established disclosure policy regarding perceived responsibility for disclosure. Further research is warranted regarding the potential utility of a unified disclosure policy, and how different disclosure policies may affect patient consent for resident participation and resident surgical training opportunities.