Endoscopy 2014; 46(11): 927-932
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1390852
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Effect of a quality program with adverse events identification on airway management during overtube-assisted enteroscopy

Luis F. Lara
Department of Gastroenterology, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida, USA
,
Andrew Ukleja
Department of Gastroenterology, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida, USA
,
Ronnie Pimentel
Department of Gastroenterology, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida, USA
,
Roger J. Charles
Department of Gastroenterology, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted: 24 February 2014

accepted after revision: 08 July 2014

Publication Date:
16 October 2014 (eFirst)

Background and study aims: Adverse events associated with overtube-assisted enteroscopy are similar to those with routine endoscopy. Our endoscopy quality program identified a number of respiratory adverse events resulting in emergency resuscitation efforts. The aim is to report all adverse events identified by quality monitoring and outcomes of adverse events associated with overtube-assisted enteroscopy.

Methods: A retrospective study used data prospectively obtained from consecutive patients undergoing overtube-assisted enteroscopy between December 2008 and July 2012. Patient characteristics, medical history, procedure indication, and procedure outcomes, including diagnosis, endoscopic therapy, and complications, were obtained.

Results: In 432 overtube-assisted enteroscopies, 15 adverse events (most frequently hypoxemia, 9 /15, 60 %) occurred in 14 patients (3.2 % of total cohort; 12 were outpatients) mostly during antegrade enteroscopy. Four patients required endotracheal intubation and 4 /12 outpatients required intensive care. The procedure was aborted in 13 /14 patients, and only 1 of 10 patients scheduled for repeat antegrade enteroscopy returned. There was no mortality. Based on the frequency of adverse events, and in consultation with anesthesia providers, from August 2012 all antegrade overtube-assisted enteroscopies at our institution were done with general anesthesia. From then till September 2013, 145 antegrade and 52 retrograde overtube-assisted enteroscopies have been done, with no adverse events.

Conclusions: Monitoring of endoscopy practice identified adverse events associated with overtube-assisted enteroscopy. The peer-review prompted a change in practice: all patients undergoing antegrade overtube-assisted enteroscopy at our institution now have endotracheal intubation which has dramatically decreased the rate of respiratory adverse events. The impact of endoscopic quality measurements on practices, procedures, and outcomes will be of further interest.