Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2014; 18(04): 369-375
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1385843
Original Research
Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Masticatory Changes as a Result of Oral Disorders in Smokers

Rafaela Soares Rech
1  Department of Fonoaudiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
,
Karoline Weber dos Santos
1  Department of Fonoaudiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
,
Marcia Angelica Peters Maahs
1  Department of Fonoaudiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
,
Deisi Cristina Gollo Marques Vidor
1  Department of Fonoaudiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

04 February 2014

09 June 2014

Publication Date:
13 August 2014 (eFirst)

  

Abstract

Introduction For chewing to occur properly, it is necessary that all oral structures are present and of normal standard.

Objectives The aim of this study is to verify the presence of oral changes in smokers and the impact of the changes on masticatory function compared with individuals who never smoked.

Methods Forty-eight subjects were evaluated, split into two study groups (24 subjects each) of current tobacco users and individuals who have never smoked. The variables halitosis, presence of lesions suggestive of caries and periodontal problems, number of teeth, classification of malocclusions according to angle, standard grinding food, chewing pattern, and speed of chewing were evaluated.

Results There was no statistically significant difference in tooth loss between the groups, but the smokers had more losses manifesting malocclusion. Most smokers had halitosis and lesions suggestive of caries and periodontal problems; the halitosis was associated with the latter variable. Masticatory speed was also reduced significantly in these individuals compared with the control group when associated with occlusal alterations, in addition to grinding food with the tongue. No difference was observed regarding the chewing pattern. The presence of halitosis and periodontal problems were more common in those who smoke more than 20 years.

Conclusion There is an association between smoking and dental changes, which cause increased masticatory changes.