Semin Hear 2014; 35(03): 193-205
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1383504
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Use of Wireless Technology for Children with Auditory Processing Disorders, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and Language Disorders

Erin C. Schafer
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
,
Jordan Traber
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
,
Paige Layden
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
,
Aneeqa Amin
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
,
Katie Sanders
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
,
Danielle Bryant
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
,
Nicole Baldus
1  Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
25 July 2014 (online)

Abstract

There are several populations of children who have normal hearing but exhibit auditory listening difficulties in the classroom. Recent publications will be reviewed to support the use of wireless, remote microphone technology for improving speech-recognition performance in noise and classroom-listening abilities in children diagnosed with auditory processing disorders (APDs), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In addition, a series of case studies on children diagnosed with APDs, ADHD, ASDs, and/or language disorders will be presented to (1) support specific remote microphone-fitting procedures and (2) to report speech-recognition performance in noise; listening comprehension; and participant-, parent-, and teacher-rated listening behaviors following a trial period with the technology. The results of these case studies will validate fitting procedures for these populations with auditory listening difficulties and will provide additional, evidence-based support for the use of remote microphone technology for children diagnosed with APDs, ADHD, ASDs, and/or language disorders.