Planta Med 2014; 80(08/09): 740-746
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1368590
Biological Screening
Original Papers
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Natural Products as Potential Human Ether-A-Go-Go-Related Gene Channel Inhibitors – Screening of Plant-Derived Alkaloids

Anja Schramm*
Division of Pharmaceutical Biology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
,
Priyanka Saxena*
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
,
Jakub Chlebek
ADINACO Research Group, Department of Pharmaceutical Botany and Ecology, Charles University, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
,
Lucie Cahlíková
ADINACO Research Group, Department of Pharmaceutical Botany and Ecology, Charles University, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
,
Igor Baburin
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
,
Steffen Hering
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
,
Matthias Hamburger
Division of Pharmaceutical Biology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
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Publikationsverlauf

received 27. Februar 2014
revised 02. Mai 2014

accepted 19. Mai 2014

Publikationsdatum:
25.Juni 2014 (online)

Abstract

Inhibition of the cardiac human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel is a problematic off-target pharmacological activity and, hence, a major safety liability in clinical practice. Several non-cardiac drugs have been restricted in their use, or even removed from the market due to this potentially fatal adverse effect. Comparatively little is known about the human ether-a-go-go-related gene inhibitory potential of plant-derived compounds. In the course of an ongoing human ether-a-go-go-related gene in vitro study, a total of 32 structurally diverse alkaloids of plant origin as well as two semi-synthetically obtained protoberberine derivatives were screened by means of an automated Xenopus oocyte assay. Protopine, (+)-bulbocapnine, (+)-N-methyllaurotetanine, (+)-boldine, (+)-chelidonine, (+)-corynoline, reserpine, and yohimbine reduced the human ether-a-go-go-related gene current by ≥ 50 % at 100 µM, and were submitted to concentration-response experiments. Our data show that some widely occurring plant-derived alkaloids carry a potential risk for human ether-a-go-go-related gene toxicity.

* These authors contributed equally to this work.


Supporting Information