Endoscopy 2014; 46(05): 432-434
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1364957
Case report/series
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Various applications of endoscopic scissors in difficult endoscopic interventions

Won-Ju Kee
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Chang-Hwan Park
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Kyoung-Myeun Chung
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Seon-Young Park
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Chung-Hwan Jun
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Ho-seok Ki
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Hyun-Soo Kim
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Sung-Kyu Choi
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
,
Jong-Sun Rew
Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted27 December 2013

accepted after revision31 December 2013

Publication Date:
06 February 2014 (eFirst)

Endoscopic scissors offer a benefit over other devices by avoiding potential complications related to thermal and mechanical injury of surrounding structures. We describe our experience with endoscopic scissors in three difficult endoscopic interventions. A fishbone embedded in the esophageal wall penetrated very close to the pulsating aorta and the bronchus. The fishbone was cut in half by endoscopic scissors and removed without injury to adjacent organs. A gastric submucosal tumor with an insulated core that could not be resected by electrosurgical devices was cut using endoscopic scissors following endoloop placement. Extravascular coil migration after transcatheter arterial embolization resulted in a duodenal ulcer. The metallic coil on the duodenal ulcer was cut by endoscopic scissors without mechanical or thermal injury.