Amer J Perinatol 2014; 31(09): 753-758
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1359722
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Labor Progression in Teenage Women

Jessica A. McPherson
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
,
Methodius Tuuli
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
,
Anthony O. Odibo
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
,
Kimberly A. Roehl
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
,
Qiuhong Zhao
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
,
Alison G. Cahill
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

03 September 2013

19 September 2013

Publication Date:
11 December 2013 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective Compare labor progression in first and second stages in women < 18 years with those ≥18 years.

Study Design Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women at term that reached the second stage of labor between 2004 and 2008. The first stage in women < 18 years was compared with women ≥18 years. Average labor curves were constructed and median time spent to progress 1 cm in dilation and total time from 4 to 10 cm was estimated. Time spent pushing and total duration of second stage were compared between groups. Analyses were then stratified by parity.

Results There was no significant difference in progress of the first stage of labor between women < 18 years and those ≥18 years. In the second stage, nulliparous teenage women were less likely to have a duration > 60 or 120 minutes.

Conclusion Laboring women < 18 years should be managed with the same expectations of labor as women ≥18 years.