Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2014; 18(02): 128-131
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1358585
Original Research
Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Masticatory Changes in Oral Breath Secondary to Allergic Rhinitis: Integrative Review

Luciana Ângelo Bezerra
1  MSc in Health Science/Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
,
Hilton Justino da Silva
2  PhD in Nutrition/UFPE. Department of Human Comunication Health/UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
,
Ana Carolina Cardoso de Melo
3  MSc in Human Comunication Health/UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
,
Klyvia Juliana Rocha de Moraes
4  MSc in Pathology/UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
,
Renata Andrade da Cunha
1  MSc in Health Science/Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
,
Daniele Andrade da Cunha
2  PhD in Nutrition/UFPE. Department of Human Comunication Health/UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
,
Décio Medeiros
5  PhD in Pediatrics/UNIFESP. Department of Pediatrics of UFPE, Recife, PE, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

15 June 2013

07 July 2013

Publication Date:
25 November 2013 (eFirst)

  

Abstract

Introduction The III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis (2012) defines allergic rhinitis as a nasal mucosa inflammation, mediated by immunoglobulin E, after exposure to allergens. The classic signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis are nasal obstruction, watery rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment, and mouth breathing (breathing predominantly through the mouth, regardless of the cause, due to a nasal breathing impairment) in some cases.

Objective To evaluate the literature on masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing due to allergic rhinitis.

Methods We conducted a search of the past 10 years, at Bireme and MEDLINE databases, for articles that covered masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing secondary to allergic rhinitis.

Results We found 1,986 articles, including 15 repeated in databases, but only two articles met the inclusion criteria fully.

Discussion We found few studies to answer the question raised in this review, and those studies have some methodological limitations. Most articles claimed no have statistically significant differences in masticatory changes in this population.

Conclusion A better controlled study (isolating diseases, exposure time), with a larger sample (sample calculation appropriate), would be necessary to examine such changes.