J Neurol Surg Rep 2013; 74(01): 017-022
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1346980
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma of the Clivus: Case Report and Review of the Literature

Yakov Gologorsky
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
Raj K. Shrivastava
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
Fedor Panov
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
Justin Mascitelli
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
Anthony Del Signore
2   Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
Satish Govindaraj
2   Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
Mark Smethurst
3   Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
,
David J. Bronster
4   Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

26 December 2012

19 February 2013

Publication Date:
29 May 2013 (online)

Abstract

Primary intraosseous hemangiomas are benign, vascular malformations that account for approximately 1% of all primary bone neoplasms. These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms. When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas. Because of this, these tumors can be missed in many cases or may be misinterpreted as more ominous lesions like multiple myeloma or osteosarcoma. Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported. We report a patient case with review of recent pertinent literature.