Int J Sports Med 2013; 34(07): 623-630
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1327662
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The Effect of Velocity on Load Range during Isokinetic Hip Abduction and Adduction Exercise

C. N. Gautrey1, T. Watson2, A. Mitchell1
  • 1Sport, Health and Exercise, University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
  • 2Physiotherapy, University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 12 September 2012

Publication Date:
26 February 2013 (eFirst)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to quantify the components of acceleration, load range and deceleration through a velocity spectrum during concentric hip abduction and adduction isokinetic exercise, and to investigate the effect of load range on peak torque and work done. 16 male healthy subjects performed 3 maximal concentric reciprocal hip abduction and adduction gravity corrected repetitions in a fixed order at 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360 and 420° · s−1, with a 30 s rest between velocities. Hip abduction and adduction results revealed that load range significantly decreased while acceleration and deceleration ROM significantly increased (p<0.05) with each increase in velocity. When the total peak torque data was corrected for load range there was a significant decrease (p<0.05) in peak torque at velocities of 300° · s−1 and above, for both hip abduction and adduction. Load range correction also resulted in a significant decrease (p<0.05) in work done at velocities of 120° · s−1 and above, for both hip abduction and adduction. The results demonstrate an inverse relationship between isokinetic velocity and load range during concentric hip abduction and adduction, and suggest a need for the clinician to carefully consider velocity selection when performing exercise on an isokinetic device.