Am J Perinatol 2012; 29(08): 599-608
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1311984
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Are Obstetrician-Gynecologists Satisfied with Their Maternal–Fetal Medicine Consultants? A Survey

Katharine Wenstrom
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Women and Infant's Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island
,
Kristine Erickson
2  Department of Research, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, District of Columbia
,
Jay Schulkin
2  Department of Research, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, District of Columbia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

21 November 2011

21 January 2012

Publication Date:
25 May 2012 (online)

Abstract

Objective To survey generalist obstetrician-gynecologists about their satisfaction with and patterns of referral to maternal–fetal medicine (MFM) specialists.

Study Design A survey was sent three times to 1030 randomly selected American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists members across the country, and results were tabulated.

Results A total of 516 surveys (50%) were returned; 68% of respondents were satisfied (S) with available MFM services and 31% were not satisfied (Not S). S and Not S respondents were similar with respect to age, gender, years in practice, type of practice, hours worked per week, proximity to MFM specialists, number of deliveries per year, and level of nursery in their hospital. Reasons for dissatisfaction included: MFM specialist not readily available (49%), during the day (26%), at night (35%), or on weekends (36%); MFM specialist unwilling to take care of hospitalized patients (26%); or MFM specialist does only ultrasound, chorionic villus sampling, and amniocentesis (32%). Although some generalists do not consult MFM specialists frequently, the majority of both S and Not S respondents would request an MFM consult or comanagement for 26 of 38 specific maternal, fetal, and obstetric diagnoses/complications.

Conclusion The majority of obstetrician-gynecologists are satisfied with their MFM support. The dissatisfaction expressed by 31% of generalists might be ameliorated if individual MFM specialists increased their availability and/or broadened their scope of practice.