Semin Neurol 2008; 28(5): 631-644
DOI: 10.1055/s-0028-1105977
© Thieme Medical Publishers

Brain Imaging in Intensive Care Medicine

Robert D. Stevens1 , 2 , 3 , Aliaksei Pustavoitau1 , Julio A. Chalela4
  • 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 4Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
29 December 2008 (online)

ABSTRACT

The management of severe brain injury requires a comprehensive approach in which imaging is an indispensable complement to the clinical and physiological information acquired at the bedside. Neuroimaging methods are routinely used in the diagnosis and prognosis of a broad spectrum of patients with acute neurological dysfunction. With incremental theoretical and technological refinements, imaging modalities are helping to unravel fundamental questions regarding the pathophysiology and neuroplasticity associated with critical neurological injury, and it is anticipated that this knowledge will lead to new and effective therapeutic interventions. We review some of the established and emerging structural and physiological imaging methods, and discuss their applications in patients with critical injuries including trauma and encephalopathy due to anoxia, liver failure, and sepsis.

REFERENCES

Robert D Stevens, M.D. 

Division of Neurosciences Critical Care, Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital

600 North Wolfe Street, Meyer 8-140, Baltimore, MD 21287

Email: rstevens@jhmi.edu