Am J Perinatol
DOI: 10.1055/a-2295-3543
SMFM 2020

Increased Rates of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Colleen M. Sinnott
1   Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Taylor S. Freret
1   Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
2   Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Sarah E. Little
3   Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
› Institutsangaben
Funding None.

Abstract

Objective Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are common complications associated with severe maternal and neonatal morbidity. One goal of prenatal care, especially at term, is to screen for HDP. As treatment of HDP centers on delivery when appropriate, timely diagnosis is crucial. We postulated that reduced in-person visits during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have resulted in delayed diagnosis of HDP with concomitant higher rates of maternal morbidity. We sought to investigate the prevalence of HDP during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as median gestational age at time of delivery as compared with the prepandemic median.

Study Design This was a retrospective cohort analysis comparing singleton deliveries at four large-volume hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic (April–July 2020 during a statewide “stay-at-home” order) to those in a pre-COVID era (April–July 2019). Deliveries complicated by HDP were identified by International Classification of Disease, Tenth Revision codes. Rates of HDP and markers of severe disease were the primary outcomes compared between the groups; multivariate regression was used to calculate the odds ratio of severe disease among women with any diagnosis of HDP.

Results The cohort included 9,974 deliveries: 5,011 in 2020 and 4,963 in 2019. Patient characteristics (age, body mass index, race, ethnicity, and insurance type) did not differ significantly between the groups. There was an increase in HDP during the COVID era (9.0 vs. 6.9%; p < 0.01), which was significant even when controlling for patient parity (odds ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.20–1.66). Among women with HDP, gestational age at delivery did not differ between the cohorts, nor did the proportion of patients with severe disease.

Conclusion We found a statistically significant increase in the rate of HDP during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there was no change in the proportion of severe disease, suggesting that this increase did not significantly impact clinical morbidity.

Key Points

  • Rates of HDP increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • There was no change in the proportion of severe HDP.

  • HDP-related maternal/neonatal morbidity was unchanged.



Publikationsverlauf

Eingereicht: 26. Januar 2022

Angenommen: 24. März 2024

Accepted Manuscript online:
26. März 2024

Artikel online veröffentlicht:
25. April 2024

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