CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Planta Medica International Open 2022; 9(01): e72-e79
DOI: 10.1055/a-1712-8391
Original Papers

Daikenchuto, a Traditional Kampo Medicine, Facilitates Mucosal Hyperemic Responses through Activation of TRPA1- and TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Nerves in Rat Stomach

Masatoshi Yoshikubo
1   Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai International University, Togane, Chiba, Japan
,
Kimihito Tashima
1   Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai International University, Togane, Chiba, Japan
2   Center of Pharmacological Kampo Research, Josai International University, 1 Gumyo, Togane, Chiba, Japan
,
Masaki Raimura
1   Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai International University, Togane, Chiba, Japan
,
Yuto Watanabe
1   Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai International University, Togane, Chiba, Japan
,
Yukiko Noma
1   Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai International University, Togane, Chiba, Japan
,
Syunji Horie
1   Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai International University, Togane, Chiba, Japan
2   Center of Pharmacological Kampo Research, Josai International University, 1 Gumyo, Togane, Chiba, Japan
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Daikenchuto is a traditional Kampo medicine used to treat cold sensations and dysmotility in the abdomen. This study investigated the roles of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1- and transient reporter potential vanilloid 1-expressing sensory nerves in daikenchuto-induced gastric mucosal blood flow by pharmacological and immunohistochemical analyses using male Sprague-Dawley rats. Gastric mucosal blood flow was measured in ex vivo stomachs using a laser Doppler flowmeter. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 activator allyl isothiocyanate or transient reporter potential vanilloid 1 activator capsaicin were applied for 10 min, and daikenchuto was applied for 10 or 30 min to the rat stomach. Transient reporter potential vanilloid 1 blocker N-(4-t-butylphenyl)-4-(3-chlopyridin-2-yl) tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carboxamide and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 blocker A-967079 were also administered intragastrically. Capsaicin and allyl isothiocyanate increased gastric mucosal blood flow immediately after the intragastric application, which was almost completely inhibited by N-(4-t-butylphenyl)-4-(3-chlopyridin-2-yl) tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carboxamide and A-967079, respectively. Daikenchuto increased gastric mucosal blood flow in a concentration-dependent manner. A-967079 significantly inhibited the increase in gastric mucosal blood flow induced by daikenchuto. In contrast, N-(4-t-butylphenyl)-4-(3-chlopyridin-2-yl) tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carboxamide inhibited the responses to daikenchuto only in the late phase but not in the initial phase. Interestingly, in the deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory fiber in rats, the increased gastric mucosal blood flow induced by daikenchuto was only decreased in the late phase. Although transient receptor potential ankyrin 1- and transient reporter potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive fibers were observed around the submucosal blood vessels of normal subjects, they were completely absent in the deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory fibers. Thus, daikenchuto increases gastric mucosal blood flow via transient receptor potential ankyrin 1- and transient reporter potential vanilloid 1-co-expressing sensory nerves in rat stomachs.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 10 April 2021
Received: 23 September 2021

Accepted: 19 October 2021

Article published online:
07 March 2022

© 2022. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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