J Am Acad Audiol
DOI: 10.1055/a-1709-4912
Research Article

Perception of tinnitus: direct and indirect effects of resilience, personality traits and psychiatric symptoms

Tinnitus; psychiatric symptoms; personality.
1  Speech Therapy, Paraiba Federal University, Joao Pessoa, Brazil (Ringgold ID: RIN28097)
,
Melyssa Kellyane Cavalcanti Galdino
2  Department of Psychology, Paraiba Federal University, Joao Pessoa, Brazil (Ringgold ID: RIN28097)
,
Bernardino Fernández Calvo
3  Maimonides Biomedical Research Institute of Cordoba (IMIBIC), University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain (Ringgold ID: RIN16735)
4  Department of Psychology, University of Cordoba Faculty of Education Sciences, Cordoba, Spain (Ringgold ID: RIN152679)
,
Fátima Cristina Alves Branco-Barreiro
5  Department of Speech Therapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil (Ringgold ID: RIN28105)
,
Thiago Monteiro Paiva Fernandes
2  Department of Psychology, Paraiba Federal University, Joao Pessoa, Brazil (Ringgold ID: RIN28097)
,
Marine Raquel Diniz da Rosa
6  Department of Speech Therapy, Paraiba Federal University, Joao Pessoa, Brazil (Ringgold ID: RIN28097)
› Author Affiliations
Supported by: Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior
Supported by: Senior Distinguished Researcher position (Beatriz Galindo Programme) BEAGAL18/00006

Background: Psychiatric conditions are common in individuals with tinnitus, so the ways individuals cope with such conditions and personality can influence the characteristics of tinnitus. Purpose: The study aims to investigate the direct and indirect effects of resilience, personality traits and psychiatric symptoms on the tinnitus perception. Research Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional, and observational field study involving quantitative results. Study Sample: Thirty-seven individuals who sought the tinnitus care service (mean age = 44.6 years; SD = 11.7 years), with chronic tinnitus for more than six months. Data Collection and Analysis: The specific anamnesis of tinnitus, adult self-report, resilience scale, big five inventory, tinnitus handicap inventory (M=45.0; SD= 24.1) and visual analog scale (M=6.4; SD= 2.7) were used. Psychoacoustic measurements (loudness: M=25.4; SD= 12.8) of tinnitus were performed to characterize the condition in terms of pitch and loudness. The study analyzed the relationship between tinnitus (annoyance, severity, and loudness), psychiatric symptoms, personality, and resilience. Results: Resilience did not influence tinnitus severity (BCa: -1.12 to 0.51), annoyance (BCa: -0.10 to 0.11), or loudness (BCa: -0.44 to 0.28) when mediated by anxiety and depression. Additionally, there was only a direct effect of resilience for annoyance (t=-2.14, p=0.03; BCa: -0.10 to 0.11). There was no direct influence of anxiety and depression on the tinnitus severity (b = 0.53, p> 0.05), annoyance (b = -0.01, p> 0.05) or loudness (b = 0.11, p> 0.05). However, there was an association of personality traits (neuroticism) with the tinnitus severity (b = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.15-2.17; t = 2.53, p = 0.02) and annoyance (b = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.003-0.24; t = 2.09, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Resilience and psychiatric symptoms did not have a direct or indirect influence on the tinnitus annoyance, severity, or loudness, with only a direct association of resilience and annoyance, and neuroticism trait with the tinnitus annoyance and severity. Our results suggest that it is essential patients with high neuroticism be conducted to develop personalized treatment.



Publication History

Received: 03 January 2021

Accepted after revision: 26 November 2021

Publication Date:
30 November 2021 (online)

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